zooophagous
oosik:

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astrodidact:

Only a sheet of ice protects you from falling 1000 feet down this Abyss
Photographer Aaron Huey, who is on assignment for National Geographic, recently shared a picture of a frighteningly deep hole on the Lower Ruth Glacier. The only thing stopping people from plummeting down the 1000 feet drop into the ground is a sheet of ice. One crack, though.
Huey wrote:
Staring down what could be a 1,000ft deep worm hole through the blue ice of the Lower #RuthGlacier. I was never afraid of the ones full of water, they’d just be cold, but some had no water and it was easy to imagine a long slide to an icy death. #yikes (on assignment for @natgeo in #DenaliNationalPark)
http://sploid.gizmodo.com/only-a-sheet-of-ice-protects-you-from-falling-a-1000-fe-1614438185/all
but if there’s no water how did the ice get there?

When I first came up to Alaska for my field school in 2005, a group of students attending my future university came by and visited. With them, they brought horrible news. They had gone out on a glacier for a day hike and one of their fellow classmates slipped into one of these holes.
Apparently she was at the bottom, and made eye contact with those above, but at the bottom was a stream of bone-chilling water that was quickly flowing beneath the glacier. The students either didn’t react quickly enough, or maybe there was nothing they could do. But after a while, this person could no longer hold on any longer and she got swept away under the glacier. Her body was never recovered. She’s likely still under the glacier.
So, needless to say, that’s one of the few things that puts me on edge, seeing something like this. Walking on a glacier without appropriate gear is bad news. There are no cramp-ons here. Sure glacier hiking can be done safely without cramp-ons, and often times glacier ice does have a lot of friction, but still. It is exactly that easy to die from a glacier. One slip and you’re gone. It’s probably not worth the photo.Anyway. Here’s a photo of Ruth Glacier from a distance.

oosik:

tumhblr:

astrodidact:

Only a sheet of ice protects you from falling 1000 feet down this Abyss

Photographer Aaron Huey, who is on assignment for National Geographic, recently shared a picture of a frighteningly deep hole on the Lower Ruth Glacier. The only thing stopping people from plummeting down the 1000 feet drop into the ground is a sheet of ice. One crack, though.

Huey wrote:

Staring down what could be a 1,000ft deep worm hole through the blue ice of the Lower #RuthGlacier. I was never afraid of the ones full of water, they’d just be cold, but some had no water and it was easy to imagine a long slide to an icy death. #yikes (on assignment for @natgeo in #DenaliNationalPark)

http://sploid.gizmodo.com/only-a-sheet-of-ice-protects-you-from-falling-a-1000-fe-1614438185/all

but if there’s no water how did the ice get there?

When I first came up to Alaska for my field school in 2005, a group of students attending my future university came by and visited. With them, they brought horrible news. They had gone out on a glacier for a day hike and one of their fellow classmates slipped into one of these holes.

Apparently she was at the bottom, and made eye contact with those above, but at the bottom was a stream of bone-chilling water that was quickly flowing beneath the glacier. The students either didn’t react quickly enough, or maybe there was nothing they could do. But after a while, this person could no longer hold on any longer and she got swept away under the glacier. Her body was never recovered. She’s likely still under the glacier.

So, needless to say, that’s one of the few things that puts me on edge, seeing something like this. Walking on a glacier without appropriate gear is bad news. There are no cramp-ons here. Sure glacier hiking can be done safely without cramp-ons, and often times glacier ice does have a lot of friction, but still. It is exactly that easy to die from a glacier. One slip and you’re gone. It’s probably not worth the photo.

Anyway. Here’s a photo of Ruth Glacier from a distance.

image